How to build with a Digital Pattern

How to build with a digital pattern

To build a kit, you'll need:

  • Any Kraft3D Digital Pattern - these are a multi-page PDF document which you should be able to open and print from any desktop computer
  • High quality paper or card for the model - any paper weight of 160 to 240gsm will work fine
  • Scissors for cutting
  • A  craft knife and metal ruler (sharp if cutting, or any blunt edge for scoring)
  • A cutting mat to protect your working surface
  • 'White' glue (PVA)
  • A matchstick or equivalent tool for spreading glue
  • A bit of time - kit assembly should be fun; don't try to rush! 

To build a kit, you'll need:

  • Any Kraft3D digital pattern - these are a multi-page PDF document which you should be able to open and print from any desktop computer
  • High quality paper or card for the model - any paper weight of 160 to 240gsm will work fine
  • Scissors for cutting
  • A  craft knife and metal ruler (sharp if cutting, or any blunt edge for scoring)
  • A cutting mat to protect your working surface
  • 'White' glue (PVA)
  • A matchstick or equivalent tool for spreading glue
  • A bit of time - kit assembly should be fun; don't try to rush! 
howto1

1. Print the 'design sheets' onto thick paper or card

Prefer materials with a paper weight of 160gsm or more. If your material is textured on one side, print the pattern on the untextured side!

howto2

2. Cut out parts as you go

Follow the sequence according to the instructions in your chosen pattern. Scissors are easy and quick, but don't produce the 'best' result. A sharp craft knife can produce super-clean edges, but is harder and takes longer - choose either method!

howto3

3. Score the dotted lines

Carefully mark the dotted edges with a suitable tool. The goal is absolutely not to slice through the material, only make it easier to fold!

howto4

4. Bend the scored edges

Tabs can be folded firmly to create a definite crease along their edge. Other scored lines 'inside' a part should be gently creased, to give three-dimensional shape to the triangle strip.

At this point you can hold the part together with any previously built parts, to correctly identify where it should fit - and plan how best to approach sticking them together.

howto5

5. Glue the numbered edges together

Matching numbers should be stuck together. I prefer to use white 'PVA' glue. Spread a thin amount (use a matchstick) on the outside of the material, upon the tab you wish to stick. This should then be fixed inside the model (on top of the printed number) on the corresponding edge.

Think ahead: before you stick, identify a sensible order to glue the tabs in.

howto6

6. Take your time

Try to attach only a few tabs together in a single 'sticking', this helps to avoid getting glue all over the outside of your material, which affects the final look of your model.

Let the glue dry firmly before moving onto the next tab. When all the tabs on a part are stuck, move on to the next part!